Big Changes At Statehouse—Not All Good

Big Changes At Statehouse—Not All Good

Security tight these days.

In the not-so-distant past I commented that it was unusual to see security at the Indiana Statehouse. Until a couple years ago, one could walk in any door, and proceed to whomever you wanted to see. There were no security guards, no metal detectors, no state cops. It was refreshing in one sense—that Indiana was obviously a more peaceful place than many other areas in the country. But it was almost scary in that there wasn't any security that might turn away someone with a score to settle.

Don't worry about that anymore. Attending the Ag Month kick-off last week, it felt like how they describe going through airport security. Only certain doors are now open to the public. Guards and personnel that scan guests, including a metal detector machine and a gentleman with a wand, make sure each person gets a thorough check before entering further into the building. And Indiana State Troopers were noticeably situated at various positions within the building.

Down by the chambers was something one never expected to see in Indiana- protesters with signs. About 100 or so on that day, but their loud voices echoed in the roomy walls of the statehouse, and sounded like a much bigger throng. Ironically, the people they wanted to influence were inside their chambers, with their backs to them, and a glass front separating them, and keeping out much of the noise. The main people distracted by the chanting were the guests attending the Ag Month celebration, and those taking tours in the statehouse, such as school children.

The Ag event went off as planned, and no protesters were anywhere in sight when Lt. Governor Becky Skillman took the stage to welcome people to the annual celebration. The ruckus was confined to the area around the chambers, especially around the House of Representatives Chamber.

No matter what your political views or your opinion on the upheaval that has unfolded in Indianapolis, the sight of protesters inside the state capital in Indianapolis is not something you expect to drive in from farm country and see. Let's hope it turns out to be a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

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