Purdue Weed Plots Planted

Purdue Weed Plots Planted

Break in Weather allows herbicide plots to get in the ground.

Things didn't seem that bad at the Throckmorton Purdue University Research Center near Romney in Tippecanoe County last week. The weed observation lots for Bill Johnson were planted just before May 20, and Bob Nielsen's large complex of plots was planted May 20.

"We're still running about two weeks behind of where we wanted to be," says Jay Young, superintendent of the farm. "We wanted to have these plots in two weeks ago."

Still, he is better off than his counterparts in other sections of Indiana. As of Friday, May 21, not a wheel had turned at the Southeastern Purdue Research Center near Butler, and all that was done at Davis Ag Center near Farmland in east-central Indiana was a late application of N on wheat. "They weren't even sure they were going to get that done," Young observes.

Getting the herbicide plots planted was important because a field day has already been scheduled for June 30 for anyone who wants to evaluate the plots, Young notes. Bill Johnson, Purdue University weed control specialist, is in charge of the plots.

This is the first time Weed Day will begin at the Throckmorton Farm and not the Purdue Agronomy Research Center west of West Lafayette. Johnson has scaled back plots from the days when there were more companies and products competing for soybean business. However, he believes he will have good plots to show that will illustrate the capabilities of some of the new mixes and products that have recently come upon the market.

The tour will begin at 8:30 a.m. eastern time. The Throckmorton Center is located on US 231 about 2 miles north of Romney.

Usually attendees include company representatives who have products under test in the plots, plus fertilizer and herbicide dealers who want to see how the latest products are performing. There are usually a few progressive farmers who attend, wanting to get a look at alternatives and see how the weed control staff size up what they're seeing in the tests of the various herbicides- both older ones and newer ones.

Herbicide comparison plots won't be the only thing you can see at the field day, Johnson says. He is working on how to control volunteer corn, and how to gauge the cost of volunteer corn and its competitiveness in subsequent crops. That experiment will also be discussed on the tour.

Registration is not required, but planners would like to know if you're coming. Refreshments will be provided. You can pre-register for the event by calling 765-494-9871.

TAGS: USDA
Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish